Kefir

I am Stephanie Lewis, a food and fitness blogger from London writing about my passion, nutrition and its affect on the human body. Kefir is my favourite ‘Super food’ and having used it for years I still marvel at its healing powers, it is one of the only things out there that I believe is truly worthy of the ‘Super food title’. Whether this is your first time reading about Kefir or whether you are a Kefir connoisseur I hope to highlight the benefits of this magical drink in my blog below.


‘Kefir: Nature’s Natural probiotic and antibiotic’

There are three main strains of bacteria in the human digestive system, Pathogenic (the bad bacteria), Beneficial and Neutral.

Beneficial bacteria: which keeps our digestive systems healthy are easily affected by diet and stress and it is therefore important we replenish these bacteria as often as we can, in the most natural way possible.

What is Kefir and where does it come from?

Originally from the Caucasus Mountains (situated in former Soviet Union in Central Asia) the word Kefir comes from the Turkish word ‘Keyif’ meaning ‘to feel good’.

There are various types of Kefir, Kefir made from coconut and nuts Kefir made from animal milk and beans (soy).

Lactose intolerant people typically choose coconut and nut Kefirs however milk and soy Kefir is far more commonplace and readily available. It should be said that Kefir made from milk products will often not affect those with lactose intolerance due to the fact that the friendly yeast and bacteria growing in Kefir consumes most of the lactose produced.

Kefir’s texture is similar to yoghurt but runnier with a sharper and more distinct taste.

How does Kefir help heal and keep our guts healthy?

The idea behind Kefir is that it forms sticky mucus in our intestinal tract, which acts as a trap for the good bacteria that is found in Kefir. This helps to ensure that our digestive systems hold on to the good bacteria.

Prescribed as a natural laxative, Kefir flushes out the colon, without having to use alternative treatments.

Kefir helps to recolonise the intestinal tract with good bacteria.

If you suffer from ‘leaky gut’ syndrome where years of neglect have caused the bowel lining to become inflamed and have a build up of yeast, then Kefir and a good diet can aid the healing of your leaky gut as it is easier to digest than other products and has a soothing affect on the lining.

Kefir cultures contain up to 10 different types of naturally occurring bacteria, three times more than yoghurt. It is also a rich source of calcium, potassium and protein and offers many different vitamins, minerals and essential amino acids such as Folic Acid, Lactic Acid, Biotin and Vitamins K and C making it one of the richest products out there.

Kefir and cultured foods keep the large and small intestines clean and free of parasites. It also keeps the intestines alkaline which makes it harder for the body to harbour infections.

Kefir is a product that has no restrictions and can heal a world of health problems therefore making it Mother Nature’s probiotic and antibiotic.

Fun recipes for kids

Freeze Kefir with a few drops of Stevia (a south American plant used as a sugar substitute with no calories) and natural flavouring to create kids Kefir popsicles.

http://www.red23.co.uk/Body-Ecology-Kefir-Starter_p_50.html

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